Key Differences Between In-Circuit Testing and System-On-Chip

The practical application of SoCs is endless and valuable. These chips are extensively helpful in the Internet of Things (IoT) systems, embedded systems, smartphones, vehicles, cameras, tablets, and other applications.

Fremont, CA: A system-on-chip (SoC) is essentially an integrated circuit (IC) that incorporates a full electronic or computer system on a single chip from a single platform. An SoC aids in reducing energy waste, cost, and space occupied by large systems, as well as power. It has enabled the development of various portable devices that can get carried everywhere.

The practical application of SoCs is endless and valuable. These chips are extensively helpful in the Internet of Things (IoT) systems, embedded systems, smartphones, vehicles, cameras, tablets, and other applications. By utilizing a single chip to manage the system's numerous aspects, SoCs help enhance performance.

Depending on the system, SoCs can accelerate data transfer for many activities like signal processing, wireless communication, and artificial intelligence (AI). These can also help to reduce latency if the various components are appropriately placed on the motherboard to reduce interference and interconnection delays.

SoC testing

SoCs allow for the tight integration of components on a single chip; however, this involves extensive testing of electrical products before shipment.

As SoC devices have become increasingly complicated, testing them has become increasingly difficult. Because SoC chips are built block by block, testing must get performed in this manner. Designers can install a specialized, configurable, pre-designed embedded system to test and debug each block. While testing any random logic block, such an embedded system can define test speed, diagnostic choices, fault coverage, and test length.

Compared to CPUs, SoCs have shorter wiring and utilize less power, making them far more efficient and energy-efficient. The only disadvantage of SoCs over CPUs is that they are more challenging to upgrade and repair. Whereas new components such as RAM or GPU may get replaced and used in CPUs, doing so in SoCs is a far more involved procedure.

In-circuit testing

Many complex jobs are involved in producing electronic assemblies, all of which are prone to failure. As a result, the PCB assembly, board components, and part integrity gets tested to guarantee that the completed product fulfills quality and design criteria.

In-circuit testing (ICT) is a well-known, low-cost method of testing medium- or high-volume PCBs. It produces more reliable results since it checks PCB components one at a time. ICT supports original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and contract manufacturers in continuously meeting established requirements throughout the production process.